Curriculum Guide



CONTACT US

Hether Lytton
Asst. Principal of Academics
hlytton@andreanhs.com

Guidance Department Staff

Barb Steffel
Manager for Counseling Services
bsteffel@andreanhs.com

Ana Equihua
Counselor 
aequihua@andreanhs.com

Nancy Reed
Counselor 
nreed@andreanhs.com

Ryne Pishkur
Counselor 
rpishkur@andreanhs.com

 

Dear Parents,

Greetings! The curriculum guide has been carefully prepared to provide you and your student with course descriptions and scheduling information for the 2016-2017 school year.  If you need additional information regarding a particular course or course sequence, you may contact your student’s guidance counselor or the Assistant Principal.  Please read through this guide before you begin to plan and select courses for the next year.  Your student’s guidance counselor is available to advise them with their course selections.


General Academic Information

Graduation Requirements

ALL COURES OFFERED BY ANDREAN HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY ARE COLLEGE PREPARATORY IN NATURE.

 

Class of 2016 Class of 2017 and beyond
8 credits in English
7 credits in Theology
6 credits in Science (Lab)
6 credits in Social Studies
6 credits in Mathematics
2 credits in Physical Education
1 credit in Health and Wellness
11 credits in electives
8 credits in Theology
8 credits in English
6 credits in Mathematics
6 credits in Science (Lab)
6 credits in Social Studies
4 credits in of World Language*
3 credits in of Fine or Performing Art (2 for class of ’17)
2 credits in Physical Education
2 credits in Business or Technology (1 for class of ’17)
1 credit in Health and Wellness
9 credits in electives (12 for class of ’17)
47 credits 55 credits

 

 

  1. Students are expected to carry a full load of 8 (including formation/directed study or math/language lab) courses per semester unless granted a specific exception by the Assistant Principal.
  2. It is the ultimate responsibility of parents and students to be aware of the Andrean requirements for graduation. It is the responsibility of parents, students, and guidance counselors to be certain that the student’s academic program satisfies the requirements listed.
  3. Courses are selected by the student only after consultation with the parent and approval of parents and counselor.
  4. Seniors must earn 47 (for class of 2016) and 55 (for classes of 2017, 2018, and 2019) credits to be eligible for graduation. Additionally, all seniors must successfully complete their required English and theology courses regardless of the number of academic credits they have earned over 8 semesters.
  5. The World Language and electives requirements may be waived or modified at the discretion of the Assistant Principal/Principal.
  6. Andrean High School administration will amend these requirements at anytime in response to efforts aimed at continuous improvement.

Course Over/Under loads

A normal load for students at Andrean is eight courses plus formation and a lunch session. Students may choose to take seven courses if they meet the parameters outlined. All students who desire to omit the 8th class should adopt this schedule after careful consideration of the demands that such a curricular program makes on a student’s time and energy after consultation with the Assistant Principal and Guidance.

Scheduling Conflicts

Due to the complexity of scheduling student courses, students and parents are advised that there are conflicts that may prohibit students from enrolling in all of the courses they select. The Assistant Principal and academic department chairs will work collaboratively to build student schedules to ensure that student course needs are met, however scheduling conflicts do occur. Conflicts can include the following: limited sections of a course, facilities limitations that impact the ability to offer a course, teacher availability, registration priorities, etc. Communication will occur between students, guidance counselors and/or the Assistant Principal’s office by mid-may if conflicts arise for your students.

Grading Scale

QUALITY POINTS

Grade              College Prep  Honors         AP
   A                            4                       5               6
   B                            3                       4               5
   C                            2                       3               3
   D                            1                       2               2
   F                            0                       0               0

Student Initiated Course Changes

Students have many opportunities to review their course selections, including all alternatives, before the school schedule is created. After May 1st, student schedules may only be changed to correct a scheduling error. Student requests for a course change because of a student’s prior experience or change in circumstances will be reviewed after the request has been submitted in writing to the department chair, guidance counselor and Assistant Principal. After the first week of school, only a counselor, Department Chair or the Assistant Principal may initiate schedule changes. Final approval for a course change rests with the Assistant Principal. When a schedule change is permitted it will ordinarily be made at the time of the regular marking periods (first quarter and first semester). Any deviation from this policy will be referred to the Assistant Principal who may permit them only after consultation with the Department Chair concerned.

Student Initiated Course Withdraw

There are times when a student may feel as though they are not able to succeed in a particular course for a variety of reasons. Many times, students will request a change from an AP course to an Honors course or Honors course to a College Prep course.  It is important that the student, parents, and counselor carefully consider all course prerequisites and previous student preparation when selecting accelerated courses.  Students must demonstrate that they have exhausted all available resources before petitioning for a course withdraw.  All petitions for a course withdraw start with the parents contacting the student’s guidance counselor.  After, the guidance counselor will make a determination of the necessity of the request.  If the counselor feels that it is in the best interest of the student, the student and the counselor will meet with the assistant principal. The assistant principal or principal are the only administrators who may permit a course withdraw.  Students may withdraw from a course at the end of the first or third marking periods.

Course Descriptors

  College Prep College Prep- Honors Advanced Placement
Structure Structured with expectations for independent inquiry Less structured with increased expectations for independent inquiry. Structured to align with college Board curriculum. Independent inquiry expected.
Instructional Approaches Appropriate content/skill review. Instructional strategies that promote proactive use of critical thinking skills to acquire course skills. Skill and content review completed independently by students.Instructional strategies require independent use of critical thinking skills to complete course requirements. Skill and content review completed independently by students who are independent learners, self-motivated and able to complete assignments with minimal guidance.
General Assignments 30-45 minutes daily with limited guidance needed to complete assignments.Student independently seeks help to successfully complete assignments. 30-45 minutes daily with limited guidance needed to complete assignments.Students able to work independently to complete a variety of daily and open-ended assignments. 60-75 minutes daily.
Significant learning will occur outside of class. All assignments emphasize intellectual depth.
Assessment Emphasis placed on application and analysis of course content. Assessments require foundational application, analysis, and synthesis of content and independent inquiry Assessments require application, analysis, and synthesis of content. Required to take national AP exam.

Advanced Placement Courses and Concurrent Credit

Students will be allowed to enroll in a maximum of four AP courses per school year. The AP courses are college level courses taught by our faculty. At the end of the course, students are required to take the national AP exam for that course. Failure to take the required exam will result in a grade of “F” for the second semester of that AP course.

Andrean High School will offer a limited number of concurrent credit courses.  The concurrent credit courses are courses that are taught by Andrean faculty who are approved instructors with a university in the State of Indiana. These students will earn college credit based upon the grade earned in the course.

It is important to note that Advanced Placement courses are considered the course of choice for students who wish to earn college credit at the high school level and these courses will be given scheduling preference.  Concurrent Credit courses will be weighted at the “College Prep Honors” or “Advanced Placement” level based upon its cooperating course.

The following courses are offered as concurrent credit:

Fall Spring
Honors PreCal Honors PreCal
AP Calculus AB AP US History
AP Chemistry AP Government
English 11 Honors French IV Honors
English 12 Honors German IV Honors
AP US History Spanish IV Honors
French IV Honors English 11 Honors
Spanish IV Honors English 12 Honors

Academic Honors

There will be two honor systems that Andrean High School will use to recognize the academic achievements of our students.  The first system will govern the honor roll for students working towards the Andrean diploma.  The second system will govern awards at graduation.

Scholastic honors (the Andrean Honor Roll) will be conferred based upon the weighted grade point average of the previous semester. Any student who earned a final, semester grade of “C-” or below in any course will be ineligible for honor status, regardless of grading period average.

 

Status Grade Point Average/Grade Requirements
Andrean Society All “A” grades
Academic 1st Honor 3.5000+
Academic 2nd Honor 3.0000-3.4999

 

Andrean High School will discontinue class ranking with the Class of 2016.  For all future classes, students will be awarded the academic status below.  The valedictorian will be the student with the highest cumulative grade point average.  The salutatorian will be 2nd in class.  These awards will be conferred at graduation based upon the cumulative grade point average. To be considered for valedictorian and salutatorian must be at Andrean all 4 years.

 

Status Grade Point Average
Summa cum laude 4.00+
Magna cum laude 3.7000-3.9999
Cum laude 3.5000-3.6999

Diploma Type

Indiana CORE 40 Course and Credit Requirements

  1. English/Language Arts 8 credits
  2. Mathematics 6 credits (in grades 9-12)
    1. 2 credits: Algebra I
    2. 2 credits: Geometry
    3. 2 credits: Algebra II
      1. Students must take a math or quantitative reasoning course each year in high school
    4. Science 6 credits
      1. 2 credits: Biology I
      2. 2 credits: Chemistry I or Physics I or Integrated Chemistry-Physics
      3. 2 credits: any Core 40 science course
    5. Social Studies 6 credits
      1. 2 credits: U.S. History
      2. 1 credit: U.S. Government
      3. 1 credit: Economics
      4. 2 credits: World History/Civilization or Geography/History of the World
    6. Directed Electives 5 credits
      1. World Languages, Fine Arts, Career and Technical Education
    7. Physical Education 2 credits
    8. Health and Wellness 1 credit
    9. Electives 6 credits

40 Total State Credits Required

Indiana CORE 40 with Academic Honors Course and Credit Requirements

For the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma, students must:

  1. Complete all requirements for Core 40.
  2. Earn 2 additional Core 40 math credits.
  3. Earn 6-8 Core 40 world language credits (6 credits in one language or 4 credits each in two languages).
  4. Earn 2 Core 40 fine arts credits.
  5. Earn a grade of a “C” or better in courses that will count toward the diploma.
  6. Have a grade point average of a “B” or better. This is a 3.0 at Andrean.
  7. Complete one of the following:
    1. Earn 4 credits in 2 or more AP courses and take corresponding AP exams
    2. Earn 6 verifiable transcripted college credits in dual credit courses from the approved dual credit list.
    3. Earn two of the following:
      1. 1. A minimum of 3 verifiable transcripted college credits from the approved dual credit list
      2. 2 credits in AP courses and corresponding AP exams,
    4. Earn a combined score of 1750 or higher on the SAT critical reading, mathematics and writing sections and a minimum score of 530 on each
    5. Earn an ACT composite score of 26 or higher and complete written section

Academic Plan

Class of 2019

Freshman Year  Sophomore Year 
1 Course over 2 Semesters2 Credits per course 1 Course each semester1 Credit per course 1 Course over 2 Semesters2 Credits per course 1 Course each semester1 Credit per course
EnglishTheologyMathSciencePEWorld LanguageHumanities HealthElective EnglishTheologyMathScienceSocial StudiesWorld Language

 

 

Art (2 courses)2 elective credits
Junior Year  Senior  Year 
1 Course over 2 Semesters2 Credits per course 1 Course each semester1 Credit per course 1 Course over 2 Semesters2 Credits per course 1 Course each semester1 Credit per course
EnglishTheologyMathScienceSocial Studies BusinessArt4 additional elective credits  EnglishTheology GovernmentEconomicsBusiness9 additional elective credits

CLASS OF 2018

Sophomore Year 
1 Course over 2 Semesters2 Credits per course 1 Course each semester1 Credit per course
EnglishTheologyMathScienceSocial StudiesWorld Language

 

 

4 Elective credits
Junior Year  Senior  Year 
1 Course over 2 Semesters2 Credits per course 1 Course each semester1 Credit per course 1 Course over 2 Semesters2 Credits per course 1 Course each semester1 Credit per course
EnglishTheologyMathScienceSocial Studies Physical EducationArt4 additional electives  EnglishTheology GovernmentEconomicsBusiness9 additional electives

 CLASS OF 2017 

Junior Year  Senior  Year 
1 Course over 2 Semesters2 Credits per course 1 Course each semester1 Credit per course 1 Course over 2 Semesters2 Credits per course 1 Course each semester1 Credit per course
EnglishTheologyMathScienceSocial Studies Physical Education (May be waived)Art4-5 additional electives  English/Theology GovernmentEconomicsBusiness9 additional electives

CLASS OF 2018

Senior  Year 
1 Course over 2 Semesters2 Credits per course 1 Course each semester1 Credit per course
 EnglishTheology GovernmentEconomicsBusiness9 additional electives

Andrean 2016-2017 Curriculum

Art

Chair: Ms. Marovich

Course Sequence Art (All are elective) 

College Prep: PerformingArts

9 10 11 12
Intermediate Concert Band * * * *
Beginning Chorus * * * *
Music History and Appreciation * * *
Advanced Chorus * * *
Music Theory and Comp * * *
Theatre Production * * * *
Theatre Arts * * * *
Advanced Acting * * *

 

Course Sequence: Visual Arts

 

9 10 11 12
Drawing I  * * * *
Drawing II * * *
Drawing III * *
Painting I * * * *
Painting II * * *
Intro 2d * * * *
Intro 3d * * *
Art History * *
Ceramics I * * *
Ceramics II * *
Ceramics III * * *
Printmaking * * *
Art
Performing Arts
Course Number Course Name Description Prerequisites Grade Levels
A13211 Intermediate Concert Band This course aims to improve individual and ensemble band ability through the performance of high school level repertoire. The band performs various styles of music (Marching, Concert, Classical, Musical Theater, Pep, and Rock) at various school functions throughout the year. Performance in State of Indiana competitions may be required. Able to play a musical instrument UNLESS an exception is made by the director. 9, 10, 11, 12
A13221 Beginning Chorus Students will be exposed to a variety of styles from classical to contemporary, and will learn vocal technique and the fundamentals of music. The choir performs for various school functions such as all school Masses and the annual Christmas and Spring concerts. Students should be aware that after school rehearsals may occur to properly prepare for some events. None 9, 10, 11, 12
A13231 Music History And Appreciation This is a non-performing music class for students wishing to learn about the history of Western music from the middle ages to modern times.  The course also examines the social role music plays throughout history.  Students will examine various styles through album and concert reviews to help supplement course material. Topics will also include the musical elements of melody, rhythm, harmony, texture, style and form, as well as a survey of the musical instruments used. None 10, 11, 12
A13241 Advanced Chorus Students will be exposed to a higher level of music difficulty with greater emphasis placed on concert choir performance and competition. More stress is placed on concert solos and small group performances. The choir performs for various school functions such as all school Masses and the annual Christmas and Spring concerts. Students should be aware that after school rehearsals may occur to properly prepare for some events. Completion of Beginning Chorus 10, 11, 12
A13261 Music Theory And Composition This is a performing music class for any student wishing to study the theory of music. Students will create their own musical compositions in group and individual settings.  However any musical skill level can participate in the course, no previous experience is necessary. Students learn the fundamentals of music theory and how they are used in creating compositions. Principles of sound recording are stressed as well. A musical background is helpful. None 10, 11, 12
A13271 Theatre Arts Students will study the craft of stage presence through a variety of hands-on improv and pantomime activities. Character development, proper voice technique, staging, and rehearsed presentations will be developed through the production of Reader’s Theatre, scripted monologue, and/or scripted one-act play performances. Students will also have the opportunity to study a variety of dramatic genres by reading or watching the film versions of assigned plays, completing written assignments, and developing a group presentation over some aspect of the theatre and/or entertainment industry. Dramatic performance is required of all students. Recommendation for Success: A strong interest and a desire to participate in drama and dramatic activities. A creative mind is also an asset. None 9, 10, 11, 12
A13281 Theatre Production Students study theater from a technical aspect, including the construction and design of costumes, lighting, and scenery.   Students are required to participate in the building of the fall or spring production. There are a minimum number of clock hours required to complete this course. Completion of Theater Arts 9, 10, 11, 12
A13251 Advanced Acting Advanced Acting is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Theatre. Students enrolled in this course research, create, and perform characters through script analysis, observation, collaboration, and rehearsal. These activities will incorporate elements of theatre history, culture, analysis, response, creative process, and integrated studies. Completion of Theatre Arts 10, 11, 12
E13300 Theatre Arts Special Topics-Competitive Speech I This course will develop public speaking and performance skills. Major emphasis is given to the production of formal speeches:   extemporaneous, impromptu, original speaking, group discussions, radio broadcasting, humorous, dramatic, prose, poetry, declamation and original interpretation. Students are given opportunities to express the subject matter, knowledge and content through various writing experiences, to read a variety of literary genres related to the course content, to research and organize the research, to outline, and to speak. Since students in this class become members of the AHS Speech Team, students will compete in a min. of two tournaments during the semester. Students who qualify for the National Tournament would require the student to compete beyond the school year. None 9,10,11,12
E133001 Theatre Arts Special Topics-Competitive Speech II This course will continue to build on the skills from Speech I. This course will develop public speaking and performance skills. Major emphasis is given to the production of formal speeches: extemporaneous, impromptu, original speaking, group discussions, radio broadcasting, humorous, dramatic, prose, poetry, declamation and original interpretation. Students are given opportunities to express the subject matter, knowledge and content through various writing experiences, to read a variety of literary genres related to the course content, to research and organize the research, to outline, and to speak. Since students in this class become members of the AHS Speech Team, students will compete in a min. of two tournaments during the semester.   Students who qualify for the National Tournament would require the student to compete beyond the school year. Speech I 9, 10, 11,12
Visual Arts
Course Number Course Name Description Prerequisites Grade Levels
A09211 Drawing I Students will learn to apply elements in work that effectively communicates their ideas. They will create drawings utilizing processes of sketching and rendering, contour, gesture, and perspective drawing. Vocabulary terms and the elements and principles of art are introduced. Media used include pencil, chalk, pastels, charcoal, pen, and ink. 2D Art 9, 10, 11, 12
A09221 Drawing II Students taking Drawing II will further explore the experiences and media of Drawing I. Focus will be on developing personal style. C or better in Drawing I 10, 11, 12
A09231 Drawing III Students taking Drawing III will further explore the experiences and media of Drawing II. Focus will be on creating multi-media projects. C or better in Drawing II 11, 12
A09241 Painting I Students taking Painting I engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, criticism, aesthetics and production, and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works.   Within this context, students will create realistic and abstract paintings, and learn the matting process. The media of tempera, watercolor, acrylic, and oils will be utilized and techniques of stippling, wash, under-toning, and impasto are introduced. Color theory is heavily stressed, as are vocabulary terms related to its discipline. C or better in Drawing II 10, 11, 12
A09251 Painting II Students taking Painting II will further explore the experiences and media of Painting I. Focus will be on further refining skills learned in Painting I, primarily using oils as the medium. Some multimedia artwork will be required and self-expression will be stressed. B or better in Painting I 10, 11, 12
A09252 Painting III This course is a continuation of painting principles focusing on advanced techniques and materials used in specific periods in art history. Painting II 10,11, 12
A09261 Introduction To Two-Dimensional Art Students taking Intro to 2-Dimensional Art engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production, and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. This class focuses on glass as the medium, but also includes drawing of preliminary sketches for original designs to be executed in glass. The history of glass and technical vocabulary terms relating to the discipline and to 2-Dimensional design are covered in this class. None 9,10,11,12
A09271 Intro To Three-Dimensional Art Students taking Intro to 3-Dimensional Art build on the sequential learning experiences of 2-Dimensional Art. This class focuses on glass as the medium, but also includes drawing of preliminary sketches for designs to be executed in glass. This course includes the history of glass and technical vocabulary terms relating to the discipline and 3-Dimensional design. B or better in Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art 10, 11, 12
A09273 3D II This course is a continuation of 3-D design principles focusing on advanced techniques and materials used in specific periods in hard history 2DArt/3D Art 10, 11, 12
A09283 Art History Students taking Art History engage in learning experiences that encompass the study of art history, processes, criticism, and aesthetics. The course is presented in chronological sequence covering prehistoric times to the present era. None 9, 10, 11,12
A09281 Ceramics I Students create quality works of art in clay utilizing the processes of hand building, molds, wheel throwing, slip and glaze techniques, and the firing processes. Additionally, students do research and make presentations about ceramic art. The history of ceramics and technical vocabulary terms relating to the discipline are covered in this class. None 9, 10, 11, 12
A09291 Ceramics II Students create quality works of art in clay utilizing the processes of hand building, molds, wheel throwing, slip and glaze techniques, and the firing processes. Additionally, students do research and make presentations about ceramic art. The history of ceramics and technical vocabulary terms relating to the discipline are covered in this class. Completion of Ceramics I 10, 11, 12
A09292 Ceramics III This course is a continuation of ceramic principles focusing on advanced techniques and materials used in specific periods in art history. Ceramics II 10, 11,12
A10312 Computer Photo Imaging This course focuses on the use of photo imaging software to enhance, correct, manipulate and repair photographs and electronic imagery. Completion of 2D Art 10,11, 12
A10311 Printmaking This class focuses on the four major techniques of fine art printmaking, relief, intaglio, paleography and stencil including tools, inks, paper, preparation, registration, printing processes and qualities of prints. The goal is for students to gain the skills and confidence to produce multiple images by hand printing and press while exploring personal visual expression. 2D Art 10,11 12

Business, Technology & Consumer Science

Interim Chair:

College Prep: Business

9 10 11 12
Intro to Business * * * *
Personal Financial Responsibility * * * *
Business Law and Ethics * *
Principles of Marketing * *
Accounting I * * *
Accounting II * * *
Introduction to computer science * * * *
Computer Science I
Computer Science II
Information Communication and Technology * * *

 

Course Sequence: Family and Consumer Sciences

 

9 10 11 12
 Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management (5440)
 Nutrition and Wellness ( 5342)
Business, Technology & Consumer Science
Course Number Course Name Description Prerequisites Grade Levels
B13211 Introduction to Business In this course the students learn the basic knowledge and skills necessary to understand the business world.   Through simulations, projects, and films together with lectures and discussions, the students learn about basic economics and social responsibility, credit, insurance, and other areas of business. None 9, 10, 11 and 12
B13221 Personal Financial Responsibility This course offers study in career decisions, money management, credit management, and investment opportunities, along with resource management. Students will gain experience with hands on projects focused on obtaining employment and wealth management. The students will learn the basics of filling out an employment application, creating a resume, and maintaining a checking account. None 9, 10, 11 and 12
B13231 Business Law and Ethics The course introduces the students to the legal environment and to special laws for special groups and contracts (making binding agreements).   The course will include topics dealing with the foundation of our legal system; legal forms of business, employment law and contracts Students will complete projects requiring both written and presentation components and gain an understanding of the legal aspects of operating a business. None 10,11,12
B13141 Accounting I Accounting includes the elementary principles of accounting theory and the application of that theory. Accounting for a service business, partnership accounting for a merchandising business, corporate accounting with emphasis on special journals, and payroll accounting and taxes are all part of the curriculum for this course. Special projects including stock market simulations, career research, and accounting applications are used to enhance understanding. 2.0 gpa in Math coursework and 2.5 cumulative GPA 11,12     10th Teacher Rec from Bus. Teacher
B13142 Accounting II/Financial Services This is a continuing course in double entry accounting procedures. Students will learn to keep financial records for a service or retail business. Principles covered include the bookkeeping system, debit/credit theory, financial statements, use of various journal and ledgers, worksheets, accounts receivable and payable, and payroll systems. Emphasis is placed on computerized accounting. Accounting I 11,12
B13251 Principles of Marketing Principles of Marketing provide a basic introduction to eh scope and importance of marketing in the global economy.   Emphasis is placed on oral and written communication, mathematical applications, problem solving, and critical thinking skills as they relate to marketing, advertising, and promotion. None 10, 11, 12
B13251 Information Communication and Technology This course introduces students to the physical components and operation of computers. Technology is used to build students decision-making and problem-solving skills. 2.0 GPA in Math coursework and 2.5 Cum GPA
B13261 Introduction to Computer Science – Introduction to Computer Science allows students to explore the world of Computer Science. Students will gain a broad understanding of the areas composing Computer Science. Additionally, there will be a focus on the areas of computer programming, gamming/mobile development, and artificial intelligence/robotics. 2.0 gpa in Math coursework and 2.5 cumulative GPA 11,12
B13252 Computer Science I This course covers the fundamental concepts of programming through explanation and effects of commands, and hands-on utilization of lab equipment to product correct output. This course introduces the structured techniques necessary for efficient solution of business related computer programming logic problems and coding solutions into a higher-level language.   Includes program flowcharting, pseudo coding, and hierarchy charts as a means of solving these problems. Intro to Computer Science 11,12
B13253 Computer Science II This course is a continuation of Computer Programming I. This course will provide programming through explanation and effects of commands, and ON-on utilization of lab equipment to product correct output. This course introduces the structured techniques necessary for efficient solution of business related computer programming logic problems and coding solutions into a higher-level language. Includes program flowcharting, pseudo coding, and hierarchy charts as a means of solving these problems. Comp. Science I 11, 12
Course Number Course Name Description Prerequisites Grade Levels
B13271 Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management This course prepares students for occupations and higher education programs of study related to the entire spectrum of careers in the hospitality industry. Major topics include: introduction to the hospitality industry, food safety and personal hygiene, sanitation and safety regulations, procedures and emergencies; basic culinary skills, culinary math, food preparation techniques, and the principles of purchasing, storage, preparation and service of food and food products. Laboratory experiences will focus on how to apply the basic principles of sanitation and safety in order to maintain safe and healthy food service and hospitality environments; use and maintain related tools and equipment; and apply management principles in food service and hospitality operations. none 9,10,11, 12
B13281 Nutrition and Wellness Nutrition and Wellness is an introductory course valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers related to nutrition, food, and wellness. This is a nutrition class that introduces students to only the basics of food preparation so they can become self-sufficient in accessing healthy and nutritious foods. Major course topics include nutrition principles and applications; influences on nutrition and wellness; food preparation, safety, and sanitation; and science, technology, and careers in nutrition and wellness. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of nutrition, food, and wellness. Food preparation experiences are a required component. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied. This course is the first in a sequence of courses that provide a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to nutrition, food, and wellness. none 9,10,11, 12

Mathematics

Chair: Mr. Giorgio

Course Sequence

 

College Prep

9th 10th 11th 12th
Alg1 Geo Alg2 PreCal

 

College Prep Honors and Advanced Placement                                

9th 10th 11th 12th
Alg1 Honors Geo Honors Alg2/Trig Honors PreCal Honors
Alg1 Honors Geo Honors Alg2/Trig Honors AP Calc AB
Geometry Honors Alg2/Trig Honors PreCal Honors AP Calc AB

 

Core Courses Elective Courses
Alg1/Alg1 Honors Trigonometry (1sem)
Geo/Geo Honors Discrete Math (1sem)
Alg2 / Alg2 Trig Honors / PreCal or PreCal Honors Probability and Statistics  (1sem)
Probability and Statistics Honors (1sem)
Math Lab
Mathematics
Course Number Course Name Description Prerequisites Grade Levels
M09111 Algebra I This course includes (1) properties of real numbers, (2) solving linear and quadratic equations, (3) solving linear inequalities, (4) solving verbal problems, (5) operations with polynomials, (6) graphing relations and functions, and (7) operations with rational expressions. None 9
M09112 Algebra I Honors Honors Algebra I provides a formal development of the algebraic skills and concepts necessary for students who will take other advanced college-preparatory courses. In particular, the instructional program in this course provides for the use of algebraic skills in a wide range of problem-solving situations. The concept of function is emphasized throughout the course.   Topics include: (1) properties of real numbers, (2) solving linear equations, (3) basic operations with polynomials, (4) solving quadratic equations and systems, (5) properties of exponents, and (6) introductory topics from statistics and probability. Placement Committee 9
M10111 Geometry This course is a study of plane and solid Euclidian geometry. It reviews basic geometric concepts and constructions and extends into the detailed study of proof, parallelism, polygons and circles, similarity, congruence, areas, and volumes. Completion of Algebra I or Placement committee 9, 10
M10112 Geometry Honors Honors Geometry provides students with experiences that deepen the understanding of shapes and their properties.   Deductive and inductive reasoning as well as investigative strategies in drawing conclusions are stressed.   Properties and relationships of geometric figures include the study of: (1) angles, (2) lines, (3) planes, (4) congruent and similar triangles, (5) trigonometric ratios, (6) polygons, and (7) circles and spatial drawings. An understanding of proof and logic is developed. Sophomores:B or better in Algebra I Honors. Or an A in Alg. I or Freshman: Placement Committee 9, 10
M11111 Algebra II Topics from Algebra I are reviewed and extended into the study of irrational numbers, complex numbers, and various functions (quadratic, exponential, logarithmic). Topics also include operations with matrices and graphs of conic sections. Completion of Geometry. 11, 12
M11112 Algebra II and Trig Honors Honors Algebra II is a course that expands on the topics of Honors Algebra I and provides further development of the concept of a function. Topics include (1) right triangle trig (2) Law of Sines /Law of Cosines, (3) algebraic proofs, (4) matrices, (5) exponential and logarithmic functions, (6) rational functions, (7) radical functions, (8) complex numbers, (9) conic sections, (10) circular trig functions, and (11) sinusoidal graphs. Freshmen: Placement committee. Sophomores/ Juniors: C or better in Honors Geometry. A in Geometry 9, 10, 11
M11121 Pre-Calculus and Trigonometry This pre-calculus course covers topics of Trigonometry listed above. Other topics covered are: graphs of linear, quadratic, and other polynomial functions; conic sections; exponential and logarithmic functions; arithmetic sequences and series; geometric sequences and series, and an introduction to limits. C or better in Algebra II. 11, 12
M11122 Pre-Calculus and Trig Honors/Dual Credit This pre-calculus honors course covers topics of Trigonometry listed above. Other topics covered are: graphs of linear, quadratic, and other polynomial functions; conic sections; exponential and logarithmic functions; arithmetic sequences and series; geometric sequences and series, and an introduction to limits. Completion of Algebra II/Trig Honors               A in Alg. II 11, 12
M12113 Calculus AB Advanced Placement This course studies analytic geometry and introductory calculus. It prepares students to write the Advanced Placement Examination for Calculus AB. Also, arrangements can be made with PNC to take this course for a credit of 5 semester hours. C or better in Algebra II Honors or Pre-Calculus 10, 11, 12
M12213 Calculus BC Advanced Placement A 2nd year college level course, it is taken as independent study under the direction of the department chair and follows the syllabus for the Advanced Placement Calculus BC. Calculus AB AP 12
M00210 Math Lab Mathematics Lab provides students with instruction designed to support success in completing mathematics coursework aligned to Indiana’s Academic Standards for Mathematics. This course is credit bearing and does not count towards Indiana Core 40 or Andrean Math requirements. Administrative Placement 9, 10, 11, 12
M12131 Trigonometry This one semester course includes (1) study of circular functions, (2) graphs of sine, cosine and tangent, (3) identities, (4) solving trig equations, (5) solving general triangles, and (6) polar coordinates. logarithmic). Topics also include operations with matrices and graphs of conic sections. Completion of Algebra II 12
M12141 Discrete Mathematics This course is for students who will take higher level mathematics in college that does not necessarily include Calculus.   Topics covered are:   linear programming, matrices, graph theory, and game theory. Emphasis is on decision-making skills in the areas of business, economics, and social science. Completion of Algebra II 11,12
M12151 Probability and Statistics This course studies measures of central tendency and spread, probability, distributions (normal, binomial, student and chi-square), and testing of hypotheses. Completion of Algebra II 12
M12152 Probability and Statistics Honors This course covers the same topics as Probability and Statistics, as well as coefficient of correlation, curve fitting, and nonparametric tests. B or better in Algebra II or Calculus AB AP 11, 12

Social Studies

Chair: Ms. Weiss

Course Sequence

 

College Prep

9th 10th 11th 12th
NA Geography and History of the World US History US GovernmentEcon
NA Geography and History of the World US History andElective US GovernmentEcon and Elective

 

College Prep Honors and Advanced Placement                                

9th 10th 11th 12th
NA World History Honors US Hist Honors AP US GovernmentHonors Economics
NA World History Honors US Hist AP AP US GovernmentHonors Econ

 

Core Courses Elective Courses
World History European History AP
US HistoryUS History HonorsUS History AP World Geography
US GovernmentUS Government AP Topics: Contemporary Issues as well as African-American Studies
Econ Psychology
Geography and History of the World Sociology
Social Studies
Course Number Course Name Description Prerequisites Grade Levels
C10111 Geography and History of the World Geography and History of the World is designed to enable students to use geographical tools, skills and historical concepts to deepen their understanding of major global themes including the origin and spread of world religions; exploration; conquest, and imperialism; urbanization; and innovations and revolutions. Geographical and historical skills include forming research questions, acquiring information by investigating a variety of primary and secondary sources, organizing information by creating graphic representations, analyzing information to determine and explain patterns and trends, planning for the future, and documenting and presenting findings orally or in writing. This course is designed to nurture perceptive and responsible citizenship, to encourage and support the development of critical thinking skills and lifelong learning, and to help prepare Indiana students for the 21st Century. None 10
C10112 World History Honors World history covers the important world historical events dating back to “pre-history” that have shaped the world we live in today. A key to understanding this course in relationship to next year’s U.S. history is certain events like the world wars are seen through a “global” perspective instead of a “domestic” one. B or better in English 9 Honors or A in English 9 10
C10113 European History Advanced Placement The advanced placement European history course follows the curriculum guidelines set by the college board. The course covers major European history from the late middle ages to the fall of the U.S.S.R. the course prepares students to take the A.P. European History exam administered every may. This course does not fulfill CORE 40 Social Studies requirements Cumm GPA: 3.0+ and concurrent enrollment in English 10Honors 10
C11111 U. S. History United States History investigates the development of the nation from the colonial period to the present with a special emphasis on the post-civil war eras. Additional emphasis will be placed on the interaction of history, geography, social and economic forces which influence national development. The course will develop major themes in U.S. History, trace the chronology of that history, develop relationships between significant trends and ideas in u.s. history, identify assumptions and biases, and relate historical situations to present day concerns. None 11
C11112 U. S. History Honors United States History Honors investigates the development of the nation from the colonial period to the present with a special emphasis on the post-civil war eras. Significant emphasis will be placed on the interaction of history, geography, social and economic forces which influence national development. The course will fully develop major themes in U.S. History, trace the chronology of that history, develop relationships between significant trends and ideas in U.S. History, identify assumptions and biases, and relate historical situations to present day concerns. A in World History and A in English 10 or B in English 10 Honors 11
C11113 U.S. History Advanced Placement/Dual Credit AP U.S. History is a survey of American history from the age of exploration and discovery to the present. Solid reading and writing skills, along with a willingness to devote considerable time to homework and independent study, are necessary to succeed. Emphasis is placed on critical and evaluative thinking skills, essay writing, and the study of primary historical documents. B or better in previous honors History or A in general History course 11
C12211 U.S. Government This course includes the study of the origin and evolution of political systems, with stress on the development of American democracy. A major focus is on contemporary politics. The Constitution and Amendments, and their interpretation and change over time, is examined in detail. All levels of government are covered, with due emphasis given to the Federal Government. None 12
C12213 U.S. Government Advanced Placement This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college survey. It covers in depth the Constitution, civil liberties, civil rights, political ideologies, political parties, interest groups, the news media, political campaigns, Congress, the presidency, the federal courts, and the federal bureaucracy. A major theme of the class is how the American political system operates today and how that system has changed over time. A or better in Junior History courses or B in AP course 12
C12221 Economics Economics is the theory of choice. The course studies how the decisions made by consumers, business and government impacts everyday life. Micro and macro economics are taught, with theoretical and practical implications stressed. Economic principles, concepts, theories and laws are incorporated into the curriculum. Practical items such as the banking system, recession and inflation, the tax system, business models, the stock market and fiscal policy from the US Government and Federal Reserve are covered. Current topical issues are included for relevance and understanding. None 12
C12231 Topics In History: Contemporary Social History Conflict In Post War Us This course examines the racial, cultural, and economic conflict in post war American society. It will also explore the resolution of conflict within the political traditions of the United States. The content of this course will allow students to develop historical research skills through the analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of primary and secondary source materials. None 12
C12241 Topics In History: African-American Studies Topics in History: African-American History examines the impact of African-Americans on the U.S. This course studies the African culture, slavery, the Black experience in American and contemporary race relations. None 11, 12
C12251 Psychology Psychology is an introductory course that allows students to understand the workings of the human mind. Topics are explored from a theoretical and practical viewpoint. Psychology students will focus on a variety of topics, including personality types, the capabilities of memory, stress, analysis of dreams and the importance of sleep, psychological disorders, understanding moods and emotions, stress, motivational techniques, and a variety of related topics. The course uses discussion, projects, videos, and other educational methods to provide a unique experience. None 11, 12
C12261 Sociology Sociology is the study of society and group behavior and provides a better understanding of their effects on an individual. Course content includes: the family, peer groups, the importance of the educational institutions in society, the effect of crime, and topics such as values, standards, habits, beliefs and attitudes which are present in modern society. Additional material includes the impact of entertainment on modern society, the emphasis on sports, the effect new technology has in shaping society now and in the future, along with other current issues. None 11, 12
C12272 Economics Honors Economics is the theory of choice. The course studies how the decisions made by consumers, business and government impacts everyday life. Micro and macro economics are taught, with theoretical and practical implications stressed. Economic principles, concepts, theories and laws are incorporated into the curriculum. Practical items such as the banking system, recession and inflation, the tax system, business models, the stock market and fiscal policy from the US Government and Federal Reserve are covered. Current topical issues are included for relevance and understanding. Cumm GPA: 3.0+ and concurrent enrollment in Honors Math course 12
C12282 Philosophy Honors Philosophy honors develops in students an intellectually independent and creative way of thinking and encourages students to relate their philosophical understanding to other disciplines and to personal and civic life. It is based on the curriculum published by the International Baccalaureate Organization. Students learn to formulate arguments in rational and logical ways and are encouraged to critically examine their own experiences and ideological and cultural biases. This course promotes an awareness of the plurality of philosophical traditions and develops ways of thinking that draw on personal reflection and knowledge of philosophical traditions. Cumm GPA: 3.0+ 11 or 12

Health and Physical Education

Health and Physical Education
Course Number Course Name Description Prerequisites Grade Levels
H09211 Health & Wellness Education High school health education provides an opportunity for students to develop skills for daily living which helps them prepare for the future. Students are provided with opportunities to explore the effect of health behaviors on an individual’s quality of life. This course assists students in understanding that health is a lifetime commitment by analyzing individual risk factors and health decisions that promote health and prevent disease. None 9
H11221 Health Careers Education This course is designed for any student who is seriously considering pursuing a career in medicine, particularly one of the many fields of sports medicine. The students will have the opportunity to explore many sports medicine careers. The students study the anatomy, causes, prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries for most of the major joints of the body. 2.0 average in Biology and Health/ 10th       Teacher Rec. from Health teacher 10,11,12
H09221 Physical Education I Physical Education I places emphasis on health-related fitness and developing the skills and habits necessary for a lifetime of activity. This program includes skill development and the application of rules and strategies of a variety of different sports. None 9
H09231 Physical Education II Physical Education II emphasizes a personal commitment to lifetime activity and fitness for enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and social interaction. This course provides students with opportunities to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness and increase their knowledge of fitness concepts through various types of activities and sports. Completion of Physical Education I 9, 11
H12211 Elective Physical Education & Weightlifting This course is for the student who would like to learn weightlifting techniques and how to design a weightlifting program. The course helps students build healthier bodies through safe, proper physical maintenance and diet. This class stresses the importance of maintaining a healthy fitness level now and throughout life. Physical Exam 10,11,12
H12221 Elective Physical Education & Wellness This course is for the student who would like to learn how to maintain personal fitness throughout their life by participating in a variety of fitness activities. This course helps students build healthier bodies through safe proper physical maintenance and diet. This class stresses the importance of maintaining a healthy fitness level now and throughout life. Some activities include: zumba, yoga, pilates, cardio activities and weight training. Physical Exam 10,11,12
H11211 Current Health Issues This course analyzes popular myths surrounding drug use in the United States. It is an in-depth study of the types of drugs commonly used, the effects of these on the human body, and on a person’s mental and social health. This course explores the long and short term consequences of drug use on our society. None 10,11,12

English Language Arts

Chair: Ms. Fitzpatrick

Course Sequence

 

College Prep

9th 10th 11th 12th
Eng 9 Eng 10 Eng 11 Eng 12
Eng 9 Eng 10 Eng 11 Dramatic Literature and Film Literature
Eng 9 Eng 10 Eng 11
Themes in Literature:  Good and Evil
Eng 12 and electives

 

College Prep Honors and Advanced Placement                                

9th 10th 11th 12th
Eng 9 honors Eng 10 honors Eng 11 honors Eng 12 honors and electives
Eng 9 honors Eng 10 honors AP Lan and Comp AP Lit and Comp

 

Core Courses Elective Courses
Eng 9 and Eng 9 Hon All Journalism
Eng 10 and Eng 10 Hon All Student Publication
Eng 11 and Eng 11 Hon Language Arts Lab
Eng 12 and Eng 12 Hon Composition
AP Lan and Comp.AP Lit and Comp Dramatic Literature and Film Literature Speech
Themes in Literature: Shakespeare
Humanities
English Language Arts
Course Number Course Name Description Prerequisites Grade Levels
College Prep Course Offerings
E09111 English 9 This course will introduce students to the reading, writing, and listening concepts fundamental to high school English. Basic rules of grammar, usage, and mechanics are reviewed, and vocabulary is learned through prefixes and roots. Readings will include a variety of genres and time periods, highlighted by an in-depth study of at least one play by Shakespeare. The course is designed to help students read with an understanding of an author’s main idea with a focus toward technique, style, and inference. Writing will include essays, poetry, fictions, and the completion of a well-documented step by step research paper. None 9
E10111 English 10 English 10, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 10 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring universal themes across a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 10 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Literary interpretation, analysis, comparison, and peer evaluation will be used to foster good writing techniques necessary for subsequent upper level English courses. This course presents an intensive review and development of grammar and composition. Students will write short stories, responses to literature, and a research paper. Students will deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information. English 9 10
E11111 English 11 This course is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring characterization across universal themes and a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write a variety of genres, including narratives, responses to literature, reflective compositions, college admission essays, and a research paper. Vocabulary study through roots and prefixes continues. Students write and deliver grade-appropriate multimedia presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information. English 9 and 10 11
E12111 English 12 English 12 is a study of composition, literature, language, and oral communication. Students will learn to read and analyze a wide variety of genres of British and world literature. Students will write comparison/contrast, analysis, reflective compositions, evaluative essays in response to themes and works they have studied. They will begin with five-paragraph essays and progress to multi-page papers, including the research paper. Students will write and deliver grade-appropriate multimedia presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information. English 9, 10, and 11 12
E12121 Dramatic Literature The course studies plays and literary art as different from other genres. Students view live, televised, or filmed productions and stage scenes from plays or scripts. Students examine tragedies, comedies, melodramas, musicals, or operas created by important playwrights and screenwriters representing the literary movements in dramatic literature. Students analyze how live performance alters interpretation from text and how developments in acting and production have altered the way people interpret plays or scripts. Students analyze the relationship between the development of dramatic literature as entertainment and as a reflection or influence on the culture. (This course is for seniors only and is taken in conjunction with Film Literature to fulfill the senior English requirement.) B or higher in English 11 12
E12131 Film Literature This course studies how literature is adapted for media or film. Students read about the history of film, the reflection and influence of film on culture, and issues of interpretation, production, and adaptation. Students examine the visual interpretation of literary techniques and auditory language in film and the limitations or special capacities of film versus text to present a literary work. Students study how films portray the human condition, the roles of men and women, and the various roles of ethnic or cultural minorities in the past and present. There is a required film literature project which demonstrates knowledge, application, and progress in the Film Literature content. (This course is for seniors only and is taken in conjunction with Dramatic Literature to fulfill the senior English requirement.) B or higher in English 11 12
E12141 Speech Students will gain the knowledge, skills and confidence to effectively stand on their feet and make a presentation that is convincing and believable. This course will require students to research, to write outlines, note cards and evaluations in preparation for speeches. Students will present individual and group speeches. (This course is for seniors only and is taken in conjunction with Composition to fulfill the senior English requirement.) C or higher in English 11 12
E13121 Humanities This course is based upon the Greatbooks series and will offer all first year students an exposure to the great literary works of the world. This course is taken in conjunction with English 9 or English 9 honors None 9
College Prep Honors and Advanced Placement Course Offerings
E09112 English 9 Honors This course is open to incoming freshmen who have demonstrated a marked proficiency in reading, writing, and active participation in class discussions. Readings will include a variety of genres and time periods, highlighted by an in-depth study of at least one play by Shakespeare. The course is designed to help students read with an understanding of an author’s main idea with a focus toward technique, style, and inference. This course provides both independent study and class activities to enable students to analyze literature in greater depth than in the English 9 syllabus allows. Writing will include essays, poetry, fiction, and the completion of a well-documented step by step research paper. Vocabulary is learned through Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon roots and prefixes. Although all students have the option to take the English Advanced Placement exams their junior and senior years, the honors program offers specific preparation for this exam. Admission is by score of 75th percentile or higher on the entrance exam and a grade of B or higher in eighth grade English or language arts class. 9
E10112 English 10 Honors This is a skill based course that will allow students to trace the development of major historical and cultural significance on classical and contemporary literature in fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Students will define, identify and apply rhetorical devices to enhance analysis of the author’s purpose. Students will research, evaluate and present an argument on a chosen topic. Students will write narrative essays, analytical essays, persuasive essays and compare and contrast essays. Students will use Greek and Latin roots to determine meanings of unfamiliar words. Students will study grammar and usage rules to strengthen their writing complexity. This is a rigorous course that will require critical thinking and writing skills.   Although all students have the option to take the English Advanced Placement exams their junior and senior years, the honors program offers specific preparation for this exam. B or higher in Honors English 9 or an A in English 9 10
E11112 English 11 Honors This course studies representative works and authors of the United States from pre-Revolutionary times to the present. Students will read, analyze, evaluate, critique, and actively respond to a wide variety of literary genres that reflect American culture, including quality works of various ethnic and cultural minorities. Students will also study and apply effective writing strategies of exposition and persuasion. Students will write genres, such as critiques, analysis, creative, expository, and persuasive. Students will also write at least one research paper utilizing MLA format. Improvement in sentence structure and variety, diction, control of tone, voice, and mechanics will be emphasized throughout the year. Common SAT words will be studied in preparation for college entrance exams. B or higher in Honors English 10 or an A in English 10 11
E11113 Advanced Placement Language And Composition The AP English Language and Composition course is designed to emphasize analysis of communication techniques and the use of rhetorical devices. Students will read, analyze, and respond to a variety of selections ranging from early American writing to recent publications and visual texts. Focus will be on each work’s purpose, style, historical and social context, tone, target audience, and the rhetorical appeals contained in it. Students will consider the direct and indirect effects of rhetorical devices and strategies. Formal and informal writing assignments, oral presentations, and multimedia projects will cover a range of styles including expository, analytical, argumentative, reflective, and creative. Students will also write two research papers and document their research or reference sources using MLA format. Improvement in sentence structure and variety, diction, control of tone, voice, and mechanics will be emphasized throughout the year. Common SAT words will be studied in preparation for college entrance exams. B or higher in Honors English 10 or an A in English 10 11
E11114 Composition This semester course is for juniors only and is taken in conjunction with Themes and Literature: Good and Evil to fulfill English requirement. In this course, students will study and apply effective rhetorical strategies of narration, description, exposition, and persuasion. Using the writing process, students demonstrate a command of vocabulary. English language conventions, research and organizational skills, an awareness of the audience, the purpose for writing and style. Students will read classic and cont. literature and articles, and use appropriate works as models for writing. Students will write a variety of types of compositions, including research paper, college entrance exams, fictional narratives, reflective compositions, academic essays, and responses to literature. B or higher in English 10 11
E11115 Themes in Literature: Good and Evil This course is for juniors and is taken in conjunction with Composition to fulfill the junior English requirement.   This course wrestles with the concepts of Good and Evil and the ways in which they impact and inform our codes of conduct, value systems, punishments and rewards. These complex ideas are examined as they are represented in diverse texts ranging from classic works to contemporary novels. The objective of this course is for students to establish compelling answers to key question by applying literary texts to their own lives. Through studying literature from many different genres, cultures, and time periods and engaging ourselves in debate, writing, and small-group project, students explore these issues and their implications for their own ethical viewpoints. B or higher in English 10 11
E12112 English 12 Honors This course studies representative works and authors of England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Canada, Newfoundland, Australia, New Zealand, India, South Africa, Kenya, Botswana, and others in the Commonwealth of Nations. Students will examine a wide variety of literary genres that reflect the English-speaking peoples from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present. Students will also study and apply effective writing strategies of exposition, narration, persuasion, and research. Students will write genres, such as critiques, analysis, creative, expository, and persuasive. Students will also write at least one research paper utilizing MLA format. Improvement in sentence structure and variety, diction, control of tone, voice, and mechanics will be emphasized throughout the year. B or higher in Honors English 11 or Advanced Placement Language and Composition or an A in English 11 12
E12113 Advanced Placement Literature And Composition The AP English Literature and Composition course is designed to build on students’ knowledge from previous English courses while directing their analytical, interpretive, and presentation skills using “imaginative literature” as its base.   Fundamental principles that students focus on throughout the entire year include understanding the use of language in poetry, short stories, dramas, novels and memoirs; learning the importance of structure, style, and theme in the development of a work; integrating knowledge of literary terms and elements within a given work; and continued use of proper research techniques and informed analysis of the above elements. These four key areas will help students have a better appreciation of literature at both academic and personal levels. The organization of this course follows the requirements and guidelines of the College Board’s AP English Course Description and is intended to prepare senior level students for the AP English Literature and Composition Exam administered in May of the student’s senior year, as well as English courses that students will take at the college level. B or higher in Honors English 11 an A in English 11 12
Department Electives
E00210 Language Arts Lab This course is for students who need additional support in language arts (writing, reading, speaking, and listening). It is a supplemental course taken in addition to English 9, 10, 11, or 12 that provides students with individualized or small group instruction designed to support success in completing language arts coursework aligned with Indiana’s Academic Standards. This course may also be used for students who need extra preparation to take college placement exams Administrative Placement 9, 10, 11, 12
E11211 Creative Writing This course is open to juniors and seniors only. Students will study and apply effective rhetorical writing strategies for prose and poetry. Using the writing process, students will demonstrate a command of vocabulary, the nuances of language and vocabulary, English language conventions, an awareness of the audience, the purpose of writing, and their own writing style. Students will complete a creative writing project. B or higher in English 10 11, 12
E11212 Themes in Literature: Shakespeare This semester course is a study of universal themes appropriate to the age level as well as interest level as well of high school juniors and seniors by concentrating on the works of William Shakespeare. The course will begin with an intense examination of his tragedies and end with a study of his comedies. Writing assignments will allow students to focus on the struggles of the past and relate them to current social problems. In addition to frequent writing assignments, course work will include reading, critical thinking, speech, and dramatic elements. B in English 10 or English 11 11, 12
E12141 Speech In this course, students will gain the knowledge, skills, and confidence to effectively stand on their feet and make a presentation that is convincing and believable. This course will require students to research, to write outlines and papers in preparation for speeches. This course will require students to analyze media, peers and written documents before presenting their speeches. C or Higher in English 10 or 11 11,12
E13111 Journalism Journalism, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts, the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, and Standards for Student Publications and Journalism is a study of communications history including the legal boundaries and the ethical principles that guide journalistic media today. It includes a comparison study journalistic media and other types of writing/media. Journalism will expose students to different elements of media which include the following: different styles of journalistic writing, photojournalism, AP style, ideography, online media, design, and multimedia. Students will also learn the basic skills for the following Adobe software programs: In Design, Photoshop, Illustrator, Light Room, and Premiere. Students will gain a basic understanding for creating a news website, magazine, news blog, and utilizing adverting and social media for promotion. None 9, 10, 11, 12
E13211 Student Publication I Student Publications is a yearlong course designed to be an in-depth application of the theory and skill mastered in the first year journalism class. Students generate, write, and edit stories for the Acropolis. In addition to writing articles, students will design computer-generated layouts, as well as meet all predetermined production and editorial deadlines. Motivation, responsibility, independence, and self-direction are essential characteristics for a student who enrolls in this course. Must have completed English 9 or higher and Journalism. Student must have a B or higher in Journalism 10, 11, 12
E13222 Student Publication II Honors This course is a continuation and more advanced application of the journalistic skills mastered in Student Publications I. Strong leadership skills, independence, motivation, and a sense of individual responsibility are essential in this course. Student must have earned a B or higher in Student Publications I and have Journalism teacher’s recommendation. 10, 11, 12
E13232 Student Publication III Honors This course is designed to develop and enhance individual research, as well as journalistic design, computer , and publication skills learned in Student Publications II. This course requires strong leadership skills and self-motivation; students are expected to take on more responsibility individually as well as at the staff level. Articles must consistently reflect ethical research, strong journalistic writing, and a balance of sources and issues. Student must have earned a B or higher in Student Publications II. 10, 11, 12

Science

Chair: Mrs. Giorgio

Course Sequence

College Prep

9th 10th 11th 12th
Bio Chemistry  Physics Science Elective
Bio Integrated Chem/Physics Chemistry Physics
Bio Integrated Chem/Physics Chemistry or Physics

 

College Prep Honors and Advanced Placement                                

9th 10th 11th 12th
BioHon ChemistryHon  PhysicsHon AP Bio, AP Chem
BioHon ChemistryHon  Physics AP AP Bio, AP Chem
BioHon ChemistryHon  Physics AP Science Elective
BioHon ChemistryHon  Physics AP AP Bio, AP Chem,Science Elective

 

Core Courses Elective Courses
 Biology  AP Bio, AP Chem, AP Physics
 Chemistry  Environmental Science
 Integrated Chem and Physics  Astronomy
Physics  Anatomy and Physiology
SCIENCE
Course Number Course Name Description Prerequisites Grade Levels
S09111 Biology Biology is the study of all life on Earth from the simplest organisms to the most complex. The course explores cells as the basic units of life by analyzing their chemistry, structure, and reproduction. In addition, students learn about matter and energy transfer, interdependencies and interactions with the environment, genetics and heredity, and change in populations over time. This course offers students the opportunity to develop critical thinking skills through the scientific method and also incorporates essential laboratory techniques and field investigations that will help the students prepare for the Biology ECA, which is a comprehensive exam requirement for all freshmen students. None 9
S09112 Biology Honors Honors Biology provides an in-depth study of the structures of living organisms and their functions through the use of lecture and laboratory investigation. Students discuss all topics covered in Biology I – cellular structure and chemistry, energy transfer, molecular basis of heredity, genetics, cellular reproduction, evolution and interdependence – in addition to more advanced topics such as animal physiology, disease, and emerging biotechnologies. Honors Biology emphasizes independent study techniques and the development of critical thinking skills. Placement Committee 9
S10111 Earth & Space Science Earth and Space Science provides the study of the earth’s spheres and its solar system. This course emphasizes on the study of origin, organization and evolution of the earth and its universe. Students have the opportunity to gain knowledge of the history of earth and space, to explore the earth’s processes and its environment, to gain laboratory techniques through various activities, and gain problem solving skills necessary to help in career and social issues involving the environment around them. Completion of Biology, Algebra 1 10
S10121 Integrated Chemistry/Physics Integrated Chemistry and Physics provides an introduction to fundamental scientific methods. It introduces scientific concepts in the structure of matter, chemical reactions, forces, motion, energy, and the interactions between motion and energy. It provides introduction to laboratory work in chemistry and physics, with mastery of basic lab skills. This course will allow students to gain problem solving skills necessary to be successful in society. Completion of Biology and Algebra I 10
S10131 Chemistry First Year Chemistry allows students to synthesize useful models of the structure of matter and the mechanisms of its interactions through laboratory investigations of matter and its chemical reactions. This course provides a comprehensive approach to the principles of Chemistry. Critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and data analysis will be included and implemented through laboratory and demonstration. Sophomores: B or better in Biology and Algebra. Juniors and Seniors: Completion of Integrated Chemistry and Physics with a C or better and concurrent enrollment in geometry or Algebra 2. 10, 11, 12
S10132 Chemistry Honors Students discuss advanced topics in chemistry that are not covered in the regular chemistry course such as organic chemistry nomenclature and basic alkane, alkene, and alkyne reactions. There is great emphasis on problem solving, calculations, and laboratory analysis. Students will be involved in a major, long-term inquiry project. Sophomores: A or better in Biology and Algebra. Juniors and Seniors: A in Integrated Chemistry and Physics, A in Algebra 1 or B in Algebra I honors and concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2. 10,11
S11111 Physics Physics I aids students in synthesizing the fundamental concepts and principles concerning matter and energy through inquiry based study of classical mechanics, wave motion, heat, light, electromagnetism, and atomic physics. This class also gives basic experience in laboratory experimentation and real world application. Completion of Chemistry and Geometry with concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or higher. 11, 12
S11112 Physics Honors Classical and modern topic in Physics are studied with an emphasis on underlying principles, in-depth mathematical relationships and problem solving, as well as basic laboratory experimentation and real world application. Topics included are classical mechanics, wave motion, heat, light, electromagnetism, and atomic physics. B in Chemistry or C in Honors Chemistry, B in Geometry, Concurrent registration in at least Algebra II. 10
S12111 Environmental Science Environmental Science – Advanced is an interdisciplinary study combining many aspects of Biology, Chemistry, and Earth Science. The course is designed to challenge students through an in-depth scientific study of ecosystems, population dynamics, resource management and the environmental consequences of both natural and anthropogenic processes. Students will be required to formulate and complete laboratory investigations as part of the course curriculum. The course also incorporates the format of various seminars which discuss current trends in environmental sustainability. Earth & Space Science I, Biology, and Integrated Chemistry Physics 12
S12121 Introduction to Astronomy Astronomy covers the structure of the universe, measurement of astronomical distances and velocities, observation techniques and apparatuses, the structure of planetary systems, stellar evolution, the structure and life cycles of galaxies, and the history of astronomy. This course will provide students with an overview of competing theories to explain the origin of the universe. C in Geometry and C in Physics or C in Integrated Chemistry / Physics 11, 12
S12131 Anatomy and Physiology Anatomy and Physiology explores the structure and function of the human body. This semester course provides an introduction to the primary organ systems, homeostasis, and body functions in healthy and diseased states in order to build a foundation for further study in the medical field. Practical application of how structure dictates function in the workings of the body will be reinforced through extensive laboratory and dissection techniques, case studies, and lecture. C in Biology I or Completion of Honors Biology, C in Chemistry I and a C in Algebra I 12
S12113 Biology Advanced Placement AP Biology is designed to simulate a college freshman’s introductory Biology course. The first semester covers cellular anatomy and physiology, energy transformations, cellular metabolism and genetics. The second semester covers the molecular basis of inheritance, biochemistry, biotechnology, evolution, the diversity of life and comparative anatomy and physiology. Students are required to engage in laboratory experiments and activities throughout both semesters. A in Chemistry or B in Honors Chemistry, B in Physics (or as recommended by Physics I teacher), B in Algebra II. 12
S12123 Chemistry Advanced Placement/ Dual Credit This is an intense study of the principles of Chemistry in which laboratory skills and techniques are emphasized. This course is challenging in both content and pace. Purdue NC offers college credit through this course if enrolled in the university’s dual credit program. A in Chemistry I or B in Honors Chemistry I, B in Honors Physics I, B in Algebra II 12
S12133 Physics Advanced Placement I & II This course will utilize the same text as Honors Physics I, but will cover additional material at an increased pace in order to cover all of the topics required for the algebra based AP Physics exams. This course is intended for students seriously interested in receiving a comprehensive preparation for entering the science, engineering, and technology fields. Students will have the opportunity at the end of the course to take the Physics I and/or Physics II exams. A in Chemistry I or B in Honors Chemistry I; A in Geometry or B in Honors Geometry; concurrent registration in at least Algebra II. 12
S12143 Physics Advanced Placement C/Dual Credit This course is designed to expand on concepts developed in a prior physics course and introduce students to calculus based physics concepts and applications.   Students will have the opportunity at the end of the course to take the Mechanics C and/or Electricity and Magnetism C exams. B in Honors Physics I or Advanced Placement Physics B; B in Algebra II; completion of or concurrent registration in AP Calculus AB. 12

Theology

Theology
Course Number Course Name Description Prerequisites Grade Levels
T09111 The Revelation of Jesus Christ in Scripture The purpose of this course is to give students a general knowledge and appreciation of the Sacred Scriptures. Through their study of the Bible they will come to encounter the living Word of God, Jesus Christ. In this course they will learn about the Bible authored by God through Inspiration, and its value to people throughout the world. If they have not been taught this earlier, they will learn how to read the Bible and become familiar with the major sections of the Bible and the book included in each section. The students will pay particular attention to the Gospels, where they may grow to know and love Jesus Christ more personally. None 9
T09121 Who is Jesus Christ The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the mystery of Jesus Christ, the living Word of God, the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity. In this course students will understand that Jesus Christ is the ultimate Revelation to us from God. In learning about who he is, the students will also learn who he calls them to be. None 9
T10111 The Mission of Jesus Christ The purpose of this course is to help students understand all that God has done for us through his Son, Jesus Christ. Through this course of study, students will learn that for all eternity, God has planned for us to share eternal happiness with him, which is accomplished through the redemption Christ won for us. Students will learn that they share in this redemption only in and through Jesus Christ. They will also be introduced to what it means to be a disciple of Christ and what life as a disciple entails. None 10
T10121 Life in Jesus Christ The purpose of this course is to help students understand all that God has done for us through his Son, Jesus Christ. Through this course of study, students will learn that for all eternity, God has planned for us to share eternal happiness with him, which is accomplished through the redemption Christ won for us. Students will learn that they share in this redemption only in and through Jesus Christ. They will also be introduced to what it means to be a disciple of Christ and what life as a disciple entails. None 10
T11111 Jesus Christ’s Mission Continues in the Church The purpose of this course is to help the students understand that in and through the Church they encounter the living Jesus Christ.   They will be introduced to the fact that the Church was founded by Christ through the Apostles and is sustained by him through the Holy Spirit. The students will come to know that the Church is the living Body of Christ today. This Body has both divine and human elements. In this course, students will learn not so much about events in the life of the Church but about the sacred nature of the Church None 11
T11112 Sacraments as Privileged Encounters with Jesus Christ The purpose of this course is to help students understand that they can encounter Christ today in a full and real way in and through the sacraments, and especially through the Eucharist. Students will examine each of the sacraments in detail so as to learn how they may encounter Christ throughout life. None 11
T12121 History of the Catholic Church This course presents the Church and the Body of Christ in history: its nature and meaning, images, marks, life and ministry, guide to moral life, and the role of prayer. This course will supplement the catechesis on the Church. The purpose of this course is to supply the students with a general knowledge of the Church’s history from apostolic times to the present. They will be introduced to the fact that the Church was founded by Christ through the Apostles and is sustained by Him throughout history through the Holy Spirit. The students will come to know that the Church is the living Body of Christ today and as such, has both divine and human elements. In this course, students will learn about the Church’s 2000 years of history and about how the Church is led and governed by the successors of the Apostles. None 12
T12122 Living as a Disciple of Jesus Christ The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the Church’s social teaching. In this course, students are to learn how Christ’s concern for others, especially the poor and needy, is present today in the Church’s social teaching and mission. None 12
T12123 Responding to the Call of Jesus Christ The purpose of this course is to help students to understand the vocations of life: how Christ calls us to live. In this course, students should learn how all vocations are similar and how they differ. The course should be structured around married life, single life, priestly life, and consecrated life. Students should learn what it means to live life for the benefit of others and the value in considering a vocation in service to the Christian community. None 12

World Languages

Chair: Mrs.  Kucka

Course Sequence

 

College Prep

9th 10th 11th 12th
Spanish, French Spanish, French Spanish, French, Latin 3 Spanish, French, Latin

 

College Prep Honors and Advanced Placement                                

9th 10th 11th 12th
Spanish I  honors Spanish II honors Spanish III  honors Spanish AP, FrenchIVHonors
Latin 3 Latin 4 Latin AP
Spanish, French, honors 2 Spanish, French, honors 3 Spanish, French, AP Spanish, French, AP 5
World Languages
Course Number Course Name Description Prerequisites Grade Levels
F09111 French I The Level 1 French course provides an introduction to the language by stressing pronunciation, basic grammar and listening comprehension. Students also will have an opportunity to learn about the cultures of other French-speaking countries. None 9 10
F09112 French I Honors The Level 1 honors French course provides an accelerated introduction to the language by stressing pronunciation, basic grammar and listening comprehension. Students also will have an opportunity to learn about the cultures of other French-speaking countries. Placement Committee 9 10
F10111 French II The Level II French course enables students to participate in classroom and extracurricular activities related to French as well as to participate in conversations dealing with daily activities and personal interests. French history is introduced with an emphasis on the French Revolution. C or Higher in French I Honors or B in French II 9 10 11
F10112 French II Honors The Level II French course enables students to participate in classroom and extracurricular activities related to French as well as to participate in conversations dealing with daily activities and personal interests. French history is introduced with an emphasis on the French Revolution.   This advanced course is aimed at preparing students for Advanced Placement French. C or higher in French I Honors or A in French I 9 10 11
F11111 French III The Level III French course has a comprehensive study of Canada and its connection with the United States and France. The French students also have an increased emphasis on speaking and reading the language. B or Higher in French II H or an A in French III 9 10 11
F11112 French III Honors The Level III French course has a comprehensive study of Canada and its connection with the United States and France. The French students also have an increased emphasis on speaking and reading the language.   This is an honors course and will build on previous content and knowledge. B or Higher in French II H 9 10 11
F12112 French IV Honors The Level IV French course enables students to participate in classroom and extra-curricular activities related to French, such as presentations to the student body and to parent groups and taking leadership roles in language clubs. Students are willing to participate in conversations with native and advanced non-native speakers, either in their community or in the school. B or better in French III H 11 12
F12122 French V Honors The Level V French courses enable students to participate in activities beyond the classroom that could include concerts, theater performances, and community activities. Students will be speaking only in the native language. B or Higher in French IV Honors 11 12
F09121 Spanish I The emphasis in Spanish I is on phonology, basic grammar as well as: listening, reading, writing and speaking. Students will learn about the different cultures which use the language. None 9 10
F09122 Spanish I Honors The Level 1 honors Spanish course provides an accelerated introduction to the language by stressing pronunciation, basic grammar and listening comprehension. Students also will have an opportunity to learn about the cultures of other Spanish-speaking countries. Placement Committee 9 10
F10121 Spanish II Spanish II will continue to give students an understanding of the culture of Spanish-speaking people through more advanced study of the Spanish language. The students will continue to acquire oral proficiency and fluency in Spanish.   Students will learn how to communicate basic information in the past while expanding their vocabulary and their skills to function within cultural settings. Completion of Spanish I 9 10 11
F10122 Spanish II Honors Spanish II honors is an advanced course that will continue to give students an understanding of the culture of Spanish-speaking people through more advanced and directed study of the Spanish language. The students will continue to acquire oral proficiency and considerable fluency in Spanish.     Students will learn how to communicate basic information in the past while expanding their vocabulary and their skills to function within cultural settings. C or Higher in Spanish I HN or an A in Spanish I 9 10 11
F11131 Spanish III In Spanish III the student is expected to apply the knowledge gained in Spanish I and Spanish II and be able to increase his/her competence in the four skills: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing. In addition to the other tenses the student will be introduced to the Subjunctive Mood. The students will gain a greater awareness of the culture and history of the Spanish Speaking World. Students will focus on Guatemala and Mexico. Students will learn about Mayan Culture. C or Higher in Spanish II H or a A or higher in Spanish II 9 10 11
F11132 Spanish III Honors Not available in 2015-2016 C or Higher in Spanish II H or an A in Spanish II 9 10 11
F11152 Spanish IV Honors Spanish IV will enable students to participate in classroom and extra-curricular activities related to Spanish, such as presentations and taking leadership roles in Spanish club. Students will participate in conversations with each other in the native language. B or Higher in Spanish III H 11 12
F12113 Spanish Language Advanced Placement Spanish V will enable students to participate in activities beyond the classroom. Students will participate in conversations with native speakers in the community and promote among their peers and others the benefits of foreign language study and the study of the Hispanic culture. B or Higher in Spanish III H 11 12
F12123 Spanish Literature Advanced Placement Not available in 2015-2016 Administrative Approval 11 12
F11141 Latin III H The Latin III course provides instruction enabling students to understand and appreciate other cultures by comparing social behaviors and values of the ancient Roman people. Students are willing to initiate and participate in discussions concerning the Roman culture and language. Students will also become familiar with major historical events, political structures and value systems of the Roman culture, and recognize similarities with American society. Completion of Latin II H 10 11 12
F11142 Latin IV Honors The Latin IV course provides opportunities for students to participate in classroom and extracurricular activities related to the Latin language, such as leadership roles in language clubs. Students will learn of the relationship between the ancient classical world and the modern world in such areas as: literature, visual arts, architecture, and government. C or better in Latin III 10 11 12